Dada Magazine (1917-1918)

Dada Magazine (1917-1918)

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Please note that all files are PDFs.













Dada Magazine (1917-1918)



Please note that all files are PDFs.


UbuWeb
Historical

Dada 1, July 1917

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Dada 2, December 1917

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Dada 3, December 1918

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Attempting to promulgate Dada ideas throughout Europe, Tristan Tzara launched the art and literature review Dada. Although, at the outset, it was planned that Dada members would take turns editing the review and that an editorial board would be created to make important decisions, Tzara quickly assumed control of the journal. But, as Richter said, in the end no

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one but Tzara had the talent for the job, and, "everyone was happy to watch such a brilliant editor at work."[10] Appearing in July 1917, the first issue of Dada, subtitled Miscellany of Art and Literature, featured contributions from members of avant-garde groups throughout Europe, including Giorgio de Chirico, Robert Delaunay, and Wassily Kandinsky. Marking the magazine's debut, Tzara wrote in the Zurich Chronicle, "Mysterious creation! Magic Revolver! The Dada Movement is Launched." Word of Dada quickly spread: Tzara's new review was purchased widely and found its way into every country in Europe, and its international status was established.


While the first two issues of Dada (the second appeared in December 1917) followed the structured format of Cabaret Voltaire, the third issue of Dada (December 1918) was decidedly different and marked significant changes within the Dada movement itself. Issue number 3 violated all the rules and conventions in typography and layout and undermined established notions of order and logic. Printed in newspaper format in both French and German editions, it embodies Dada's celebration of nonsense and chaos with an explosive mixture of manifestos, poetry, and advertisementsÑall typeset in randomly ordered lettering.


The unconventional and experimental design was matched only by the radical declarations contained within the third issue of Dada. Included is Tzara's "Dada Manifesto of 1918," which was read at Meise Hall in Zurich on July 23, 1918, and is perhaps the most important of the Dadaist manifestos. In it Tzara proclaimed:
Dada: the abolition of logic, the dance of the impotents of creation; Dada: abolition of all the social hierarchies and equations set up by our valets to preserve values; Dada: every object, all objects, sentiments and obscurities, phantoms and the precise shock of parallel lines, are weapons in the fight; Dada: abolition of memory; Dada: abolition of archaeology; Dada: abolition of the prophets; Dada: abolition of the future; Dada: absolute and unquestionable faith in every god that is the product of spontaneity.
With the third issue of Dada, Tzara caught the attention of the European avant-garde and signaled the growth and impact of the movement. Francis Picabia, who was in New York at the time, and Hans Richter were among the figures who, by signing their names to this issue, now aligned themselves with Dada. Picabia praised the issue:
Dada 3 has just arrived. Bravo! This issue is wonderful. It has done me a great deal of good to read in Switzerland, at last, something that is not absolutely stupid. The whole thing is really excellent. The manifesto is the expression of all philosophies that seek truth; when there is no truth there are only conventions.
Dada 4-5, printed in May 1919 and also known as Anthologie Dada, features a cover designed by Arp, a frontispiece by Picabia, and published work by André Breton, Jean Cocteau, and Raymond Radiguet. This issue also includes Tzara's third Dada manifesto and four Dada poems Tzara called "lampisteries." Design experiments continue in this issue with distorted typography, lettering of various sizes and fonts, slanted print, and multicolored paper.


Issue 4-5 of Dada was the final one Tzara published in Zurich. With travel possible again at the end of the war, many of the Zurich group returned to their respective countries and Dada activities in Zurich came to an end. With the Dadaists spreading throughout Europe, the impact of the movement had only just begun. Huelsenbeck, Picabia and Tzara played principle roles in introducing Dada in other cities.

SOURCE: http://www.artic.edu/reynolds/essays/hofmann.php

Mona was a woman who saw another woman

Mona was a woman who saw another woman and

The Quotes of Mona's teeth . there was hair in this 'odd'e's's



She was the am know best, blest spirit of the rocks, agape and fornica, cyclades of rackment



because I need to, and I paint whatever passes through my head without any other consideration. She painted her need to okay I will wait on her heart



love's accident is murder and birth, the beloved subject, and the accidents. its loss, or neverwasness it's what whence confuses the-she paint now with onehanded.

She lets me love the others _ shes knows this way his husband of many women and he is hers too as he loves them in bed mouth lips talk __comrade. Husband of harvest, husband thy feys and fuels the farrow of nighttimes



My life.....I believe that work is the best thing. The volumes, it was not much, it was not much, to have been multiplied in the kept promises.



Her hand, she knew it was the song the shark Maldoror ate and the body



I leave you my portrait so that you will have my presence all the days and nights that I am away from you. Do not leave me now or night will shade the tears of my absence my eyes your hard pen

I was at the hospice with her dead body it was ointment and shrouds on the earth. Beside it her hush husband prayed.





At

Broken is good is crucified as wheat in the sheaf makes whole the rent is that so?
O single love of Sapphic song and Sappho found her head, heaved over the side
JIll in in inn the hospital for three months__ to Toronto resting reposed She didn't make love to me that time, I think on account of her weakness. Too bad. Ther was no body there
she was my mother




Mona loved her . Very much. Even though she left , and when she came back she had nothing to say and nothing to paint with . She was reulctant but to say
yes take me take
take me that
that
this
that th


collect

take the errors collec t th'em ina  box see what become s of the


M
collect: "th e raod text"

if tho ra od is a rod text then its happenstance collecting its name. add erase punktuation. shes a grab bad gritty girl. shes bad shes bad your bad shes bad yourbad |does it say to bad its action in the blink of the sexual beroom
beroome is broom bloom room become
beloom?
becroom?

you are a shaman

__________Do not read this


apprentice


Apparentlee
.... am a man and you ....are a shaman .... Can you travel avec 'moi' to the other side? I need your assistance. This is not a missed connection, but a request for a connection! Fail me not! O single women of love, lust and beauty ~


(inside your feet
sandal


add personal details where required
ecstatic plane s sought

biplanes only need apply!
the apple of your ass

the pineapple of groins!

______________________

beside that you need a mouth

apply glueish to 'la mienne'




_______________


there are 3 bodies
in this scene
[simone a pari]
6 arm
leg
etc.


combine all 2


__________________



`

d o r i s w i s h m a n


Ah, them old cult films and them old repressions and the sweet style of art made around the obstacles... Doris Wishman.. one of the greats..... enjoy and laugh.....



Doris Wishman (June 1, 1912, New York City – August 10, 2002, Miami, Florida) was an American film director, screenwriter and independent film producer.

Self-taught as a filmmaker, Wishman is noteworthy for her paracinematic, camp aesthetic and is often referred to as "the female Ed Wood."


The majority of her work was designed to be released in the American sexploitation film market of the 1960s and '70s.


Wishman is also one of the most prolific women film directors in the history of the cinema and in recent years has become the object of a cult following.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia




le corps est















Le corps est le lieu de tous les marquages, de toutes les blessures, de toutes les traces.



Dans les chairs s'inscrivent les tortures, les interdits des classes sociales, les violences des


pouvoirs, dispersés mais jamais abolis. Aujourd'hui, seuls les exclus créent.






Car c'est leur corps qui parle, énonce le refus. Le cri NO FUTURE - si ce futur est le présent continué - est cri d'espoir.





Michel Journiac